Open Development Platform

Eclipse Platform

Subscribe to Eclipse Platform: eMailAlertsEmail Alerts newslettersWeekly Newsletters
Get Eclipse Platform: homepageHomepage mobileMobile rssRSS facebookFacebook twitterTwitter linkedinLinkedIn


Top Stories

AMD has open sourced an Eclipse plug-in called CodeSleuth, apparently the equivalent of its CodeAnalyst Performance Analyzer, meant to give Java developers an idea of how their software is performing on AMD chips, including the quad-core Barcelona. It's supposed to help them make "informed code choices" and avoid performance bottlenecks, even in compiled code. It should lessen troubleshooting. Modern chips have performance counters inside and CodeSleuth tracks the counter information from raw address locations through the machine code emitted by Java virtual machines and back to the Java software. Once the location of a performance issue is identified on the Java software, the code can be modified to improve performance. See either http://developer.amd/codesleuth or http://codesleuth.sourceforge.net. ... (more)

Java Developer's Journal Exclusive: 2006 "JDJ Editors' Choice" Awards

The editors of SYS-CON Media's Java Developer's Journal are in a unique position when it comes to Java development. All are active coders in their "day jobs," and they have the good fortune in getting a heads-up on many of the latest and greatest software releases. They were asked to nominate three products from the last 12 months that they felt had not only made a major impact on their own development, but also on the Java community as a whole. The following is a list of each editor's selections and the reason why they chose that product. Joe Winchester Desktop Java Editor SwingLabs SwingLabs is an open source laboratory for exploring new ways to make Swing applications easier to write, with improved performance and greater visual appeal. It is an umbrella project for various open source initiatives sponsored by Sun Microsystems and is part of the java.net community... (more)

Eclipse Special: Remote Debugging Tomcat & JBoss Apps with Eclipse

To view our full selection of recent Eclipse stories click here Over the last several weeks I've received a few questions about remote debugging with Eclipse. I posted about this on my other blog back in February here but with not enough info for others to follow. If you go look at that blog entry you will see that I looked into 'in eclipse' debugging but did not find it satisfactory. So without further ado here is how I use Tomcat, JBoss, and Eclipse to build and debug applications. Whichever platform you are using (Tomcat or JBoss) you need to start them with the JPDA debugging enabled. For Tomcat this is very easy. In the $CATALINA_HOME/bin directory there is a script catalina.sh. If you provide the arguments 'jpda start' tomcat will startup and listen on port 8000 for a debugger connection. With JBoss its only slightly more complicated. Basically you need to speci... (more)

Creating Web Applications with the Eclipse Web Tools Project

The Web Tools Project (WTP) by the Eclipse Foundation is a set of open source tools that substantially reduce the time required for the development of Web applications, EJBs, and Web services. The WTP's current version is 0.7.1 and version 1.0 is coming later this year. The framework provides wizards and tools to create EJBs, Web components such as servlets and JSPs, and Web services using the Axis engine. It also provides source editors for HTML, JavaScript, CSS, JSP, SQL, XML, DTD, XSD, and WSDL; graphical editors for XSD, WSDL, J2EE project builders, models, and a J2EE navigator; a Web service wizard, explorer, and WS-I Test Tools; and database access, query tools, and models. In this article I'll show you how to develop and deploy a JSP Web application with WTP in less than an hour. I'll also cover the creation and deployment of a basic servlet and editing JSP ... (more)

What's New in Eclipse?

Since Eclipse's first release in 2001, it has become a popular environment for Java development. In the period between March 10 and May 11, 2005, users downloaded over 17,000 copies of one of the production SDK releases and over 3,500 copies of one of the stable (milestone) SDK builds on average every day. A vibrant eco-system of developers, plug-in providers, authors, and bloggers has grown up around it. Eclipse has also gained the backing of the key Java vendors including BEA, Borland, IBM, SAP, and Sybase. Developers like Eclipse because it provides a great platform for building Java applications, and companies like it because it unifies their software tools under one open source umbrella.  In late June of this year, the latest release of the Eclipse Platform, version 3.1, will be available for download from eclipse.org. In this article, I'll highlight some of t... (more)

Configuring Eclipse for Remote Debugging a WebLogic Java Application

A J2EE application deployed in the WebLogic server may be debugged in the Eclipse IDE with the remote debugger provided by Eclipse. Without a debugger the error message has to be obtained from the application server error log to debug the application. With the remote debugger provided by Eclipse, exception breakpoints may be added to the application file to debug. When an application is run in WebLogic and the application generates an error, the application gets suspended and the Eclipse IDE Debug perspective displays the error. In this tutorial we will debug a WebLogic Application Server application in Eclipse. To debug an application deployed in the WebLogic Server from Eclipse, start the WebLogic Server in debug mode and configure a remote debugging configuration in Eclipse. Next, connect the Eclipse remote debugger to the WebLogic Server and debug applications r... (more)

JDJ Archives: Eclipse vs NetBeans - "Point/Counterpoint" Special

This article was originally published in print on December 3, 2003"Eclipse represents the worst of Java" Lately, there's been a lot of guff spouted about how Sun isn't joining Eclipse. While I understand the bitterness aimed at Sun somewhat, I think that this particular brand of talk is counterproductive and, dare I say it, wrong. The talk tends to center around the concept of NetBeans and Eclipse using common technology, and I think this is misguided, and here's why. I really dislike Netbeans. I think it blows goats from here to Sussex, and considering that I live in the middle of the US, that's a lot of goats. Given the choice between NetBeans and... Notepad, I usually spend a minute pondering whether I can keep remembering to check extensions on filenames before realizing that I can, and I end up with sucky ol' Notepad instead of bothering with NetBeans. That sai... (more)

Java Feature — Bringing Together Eclipse,WTP, Struts, and Hibernate

In the article "Creating Web Applications with the Eclipse WTP" (http://jdj.sys-con.com/read/152270.htm ), we created a Web application using Eclipse Web Tools Project, the Tomcat application server, and the MySQL database server. That application (DBTest) was good, however, it had some limitations: Java Server Pages (JSP) names were hard-coded inside the servlet code SQL was also hard-coded in the command classes Fortunately, two interesting solutions can address these problems. The first problem can be addressed using the Open Source Struts framework, which separates an application's Model, View, and Controller by mappings the actions of the model to view components (such as JSPs) in a simple configuration file. The second problem can be addressed by using one of the frameworks providing persistence between the Java world and the relational database world. Hibern... (more)

SYS-CON Webcast: Eclipse IDE for Students, Useful Eclipse Tips & Tricks

View Yakov Fain's Video Training in Lesson 11 In Lesson 10 of the Java Basics series Yakov Fain shows you how to start working with Eclipse IDE, which is a tool of choice for millions of professional Java programmers. After reading this article you may want to look at another of Yakov's articles for youngsters "Teaching Kids Programming: Even Younger Kids can Learn Java". Moving to Eclipse Programmers usually work in a so-called Integrated Development Environment (IDE). You can write, compile and run programs there. An IDE also has a Help thingy that describes all elements of the language, and makes it easier to find and fix errors in your programs. While some IDE programs are expensive, there is an excellent free IDE called Eclipse. You can download it from the Web site www.eclipse.org. In this chapter I'll help you to download and install Eclipse IDE on your comput... (more)

Eclipse: The Story of Web Tools Platform 0.7

The Eclipse Open Source Integrated Development Environment (IDE) (see http://eclipse.org) is rapidly gaining popularity among Java developers primarily because of its excellent Java Development Tools (JDT) and its highly extensible plug-in architecture. Extensibility is, in fact, one of the defining characteristics of Eclipse. As the Eclipse home page says, "Eclipse is a kind of universal tool platform - an open extensible IDE for anything and nothing in particular." Although Eclipse is itself a Java application, all tools, including JDT, are on an equal footing in that they extend the Eclipse platform via well-defined extension points. Of course, an infinitely extensible, but empty, platform might be interesting to tool vendors, but very boring for developers. Therefore, the initial version of Eclipse came with the JDT and the Plug-in Development Environment (PDE)... (more)

Developing an Application Using the Eclipse BIRT Report Engine API

The Eclipse platform is an open source, integrated system of application development tools that you implement and extend using a plug-in interface. The Eclipse Business Intelligence Reporting Tool (BIRT) is a set of plug-in extensions that enable a developer to add reporting functionality to an application. BIRT provides a Report Engine API that a developer can use to create a customized report generator application. The org.eclipse.birt.report.engine.api package contains a set of interfaces and implementation classes that supports integrating the runtime part of BIRT into an application. The BIRT Report Engine can provide report generation and rendering services in the following environments: Stand-alone engine: A Java developer uses a stand-alone engine to render a BIRT report from a report design (.rptdesign) file. In this environment, the Java developer create... (more)