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To view our full selection of recent Eclipse stories click here Today the Eclipse Foundation announced general availability of the royalty-free 3.0 release of Eclipse - described by the Ottowa-based foundation as a platform "for tools integration, software modeling, and testing that has been broadly adopted by commercial vendors, academic institutions, and open technology developers." Bill Dudney, JDJ's Eclipse editor, commented, "I am very excited about the promise of Eclipse 3.0. With each new milestone release the platform has become richer in its feature set, better performing and generally more productive to use." "From the enhanced Java tools to the improved integration with Ant and other open source projects," Dudney continues, "Eclipse 3.0 is a great leap forward. In addition to enhancements to the Java developer tool box the whole plugin architecture has bee... (more)

Using the Eclipse Data Tools Platform with SQL Anywhere

The Eclipse Data Tools Platform (DTP) is a new top-level project at eclipse.org. Originally proposed by Sybase in February 2005, DTP has attracted strong community support and is currently managed by a committee comprised of Sybase, IBM and Actuate. It is an open source initiative designed to provide solutions in the data framework and tooling domains. Examples of what the DTP plug-in lets you do from inside Eclipse include: Connect to a database (or multiple databases) View database object trees (tables, views, stored procedures, etc.) Generate data definition language (DDL) from database objects Execute DDL commands against a database Execute standard query language (SQL) queries against a database View query results in table format To learn more about DTP, resources can be found at http://wiki.eclipse.org/index.php/Data_Tools_Platform_Project. SQL Anywhere is a sui... (more)

JDJ Archives: Eclipse vs NetBeans - "Point/Counterpoint" Special

This article was originally published in print on December 3, 2003"Eclipse represents the worst of Java" Lately, there's been a lot of guff spouted about how Sun isn't joining Eclipse. While I understand the bitterness aimed at Sun somewhat, I think that this particular brand of talk is counterproductive and, dare I say it, wrong. The talk tends to center around the concept of NetBeans and Eclipse using common technology, and I think this is misguided, and here's why. I really dislike Netbeans. I think it blows goats from here to Sussex, and considering that I live in the middle of the US, that's a lot of goats. Given the choice between NetBeans and... Notepad, I usually spend a minute pondering whether I can keep remembering to check extensions on filenames before realizing that I can, and I end up with sucky ol' Notepad instead of bothering with NetBeans. That sai... (more)

What's New in Eclipse?

Since Eclipse's first release in 2001, it has become a popular environment for Java development. In the period between March 10 and May 11, 2005, users downloaded over 17,000 copies of one of the production SDK releases and over 3,500 copies of one of the stable (milestone) SDK builds on average every day. A vibrant eco-system of developers, plug-in providers, authors, and bloggers has grown up around it. Eclipse has also gained the backing of the key Java vendors including BEA, Borland, IBM, SAP, and Sybase. Developers like Eclipse because it provides a great platform for building Java applications, and companies like it because it unifies their software tools under one open source umbrella.  In late June of this year, the latest release of the Eclipse Platform, version 3.1, will be available for download from eclipse.org. In this article, I'll highlight some of t... (more)

Choosing Your First Programming Language

By BryanHalfpap Many new programmers struggle when it comes to selecting their first language to learn.  Which is easiest, the most professionally useful, the most newbie-friendly?  Lets find out by showing you a range of options, their strengths and weaknesses, and some information about the most common programming languages in demand today.  At the end, we’ll make some recommendations and you’ll understand a bit more about why they were chosen. The Task At Hand Every job requires the right kind of tool, and each programming language can be thought of as a separate tool.  Just like some tools are good for hammering nails, driving screws, and leveling screws, some programming languages are innately more suitable than others for tasks like designing a website, interpreting text, or reacting to user input. Lets go through a few common use cases: Language Typical Us... (more)

Eclipse Special: Bill Dudney Looks at the Change Method Signature Refactoring

Read Bill Dudney Looks at Eclipse M8 Close-Up Read Remote Debugging Tomcat & JBoss Apps with Eclipse This column contains an excerpt from one of the refactoring chapters in my book Eclipse 3 Live. The book will eventually contain similar sections for all the refactorings available in Eclipse. Change Method SignatureThis refactoring allows you to change the signature of an existing method by changing any of the aspects of the method that make its signature. You can change the access rights (public, private, etc.), you can change the name as well as add or remove parameters, and you can add or remove exceptions that are thrown from the method. The most typical use of this refactoring is to add or remove parameters from a method. Over time, you might discover that a method would be better designed or easier to understand or implement if it took an additional parameter... (more)

Eclipse "Pollinate" Project to Integrate with Apache Beehive

At JavaOne this week, the Eclipse Foundation, along with Instantiations, Inc., and BEA Systems announced the creation of "Pollinate", a new open-source incubator project focused on creating an Eclipse-based development environment and toolset to be named Eclipse Pollinate. Eclipse Pollinate, which will be designed to integrate with Apache Beehive, the industry’s first easy-to-use, cross-container, open-source application framework for building service-oriented architectures (SOAs) and enterprise Java applications is being developed to help enable developers to more easily develop and deploy service-based and J2EE-based applications. Introduced and led by Instantiations, Eclipse Pollinate, combined with Apache Beehive, will be designed to provide developers with a comprehensive, flexible solution for building and running services and applications. Eclipse will provi... (more)

SYS-CON Webcast: Eclipse IDE for Students, Useful Eclipse Tips & Tricks

View Yakov Fain's Video Training in Lesson 11 In Lesson 10 of the Java Basics series Yakov Fain shows you how to start working with Eclipse IDE, which is a tool of choice for millions of professional Java programmers. After reading this article you may want to look at another of Yakov's articles for youngsters "Teaching Kids Programming: Even Younger Kids can Learn Java". Moving to Eclipse Programmers usually work in a so-called Integrated Development Environment (IDE). You can write, compile and run programs there. An IDE also has a Help thingy that describes all elements of the language, and makes it easier to find and fix errors in your programs. While some IDE programs are expensive, there is an excellent free IDE called Eclipse. You can download it from the Web site www.eclipse.org. In this chapter I'll help you to download and install Eclipse IDE on your comput... (more)

Developing Web Services with Eclipse

ABOUT THE SPEAKER Arthur Ryman is a senior technical staff member at the IBM Toronto Lab where he is responsible for Web service and XML tools in WebSphere Studio and Rational Desktop Tools. He is the leader of the Eclipse Web Standard Tools subproject, a member of the W3C Web Services Description Working Group, and a coauthor of the book Java Web Services Unleashed. SESSION DESCRIPTION The recently created Web Tools Platform Project extends Eclipse with a set of open source Web service development tools and APIs. This talk gives an overview of the project and focuses on its Web services support. The project is divided into two subprojects: Web Standard Tools and J2EE Standard Tools. The Web Standard Tools subproject contains support for XML Web Services, including tools based on standards defined by W3C, Oasis, WS-I, and others. The J2EE Standard Tools subproject co... (more)

Eclipse: The Story of Web Tools Platform 0.7

The Eclipse Open Source Integrated Development Environment (IDE) (see http://eclipse.org) is rapidly gaining popularity among Java developers primarily because of its excellent Java Development Tools (JDT) and its highly extensible plug-in architecture. Extensibility is, in fact, one of the defining characteristics of Eclipse. As the Eclipse home page says, "Eclipse is a kind of universal tool platform - an open extensible IDE for anything and nothing in particular." Although Eclipse is itself a Java application, all tools, including JDT, are on an equal footing in that they extend the Eclipse platform via well-defined extension points. Of course, an infinitely extensible, but empty, platform might be interesting to tool vendors, but very boring for developers. Therefore, the initial version of Eclipse came with the JDT and the Plug-in Development Environment (PDE)... (more)

Modeling Web Services Choreography with New Eclipse Tool

Choreography is the dark continent of Web services: few onlookers have traveled there, and many question whether there are any riches to be brought home from the trip. In the first place, choreographies bear such a striking resemblance to business processes that the novice might think that the two types of artifacts are indistinguishable. After all, isn't choreography just a way to describe what a business process does (i.e., it choreographs the actions of its participants)? And then there is the dearth of choreography tools; until recently choreography was a topic learned by reading, not by hands-on experimentation. This article takes the trip. It describes how, in the ideal set of design tools, not only are choreographies and processes treated as entirely different artifacts (with different development life cycles), but that special modeling techniques are availa... (more)