Open Development Platform

Eclipse Platform

Subscribe to Eclipse Platform: eMailAlertsEmail Alerts newslettersWeekly Newsletters
Get Eclipse Platform: homepageHomepage mobileMobile rssRSS facebookFacebook twitterTwitter linkedinLinkedIn


Top Stories

This article was originally published in print on December 3, 2003"Eclipse represents the worst of Java" Lately, there's been a lot of guff spouted about how Sun isn't joining Eclipse. While I understand the bitterness aimed at Sun somewhat, I think that this particular brand of talk is counterproductive and, dare I say it, wrong. The talk tends to center around the concept of NetBeans and Eclipse using common technology, and I think this is misguided, and here's why. I really dislike Netbeans. I think it blows goats from here to Sussex, and considering that I live in the middle of the US, that's a lot of goats. Given the choice between NetBeans and... Notepad, I usually spend a minute pondering whether I can keep remembering to check extensions on filenames before realizing that I can, and I end up with sucky ol' Notepad instead of bothering with NetBeans. That sai... (more)

Eclipse Special: Bill Dudney on the Web Tools Project

Related Link: JDJ Exclusive Q & A with Mike Milinkovich, Executive Director, Eclipse Foundation The Web Tools Project (WTP) went live late last month and I finally had some time to play around with it. I'll summarize what is there in this article and then write up some of the detail over the next couple of weeks. The WTP consists of two major contributions, one from IBM and the other ObjectWeb. The IBM contribution consists of pieces of their development tools for WebSphere. The ObjectWeb contribution is what was known as Lomboz. This initial article will focus on the IBM contribution since Lomboz has great online documentation The prerequisites for the IBM tools are heavy. You must have EMF, GEF, VE and XSD in order to use the tool set. You also need Eclipse 3.0, if you have not made the upgrade yet it is well worth it. The IBM tools are about 54 MB, the prerequisite... (more)

Eclipse: A Solid Desktop, Rich-Client, or Embedded Application Framework

By now, you've probably heard about Eclipse as "the Open Source Java IDE" (www.eclipse.org). Today, several companies have looked past the Java IDE plug-ins provided as part of Eclipse, and are creating products that use Eclipse as a tool integration platform, both inside and outside of the Java arena. But what about using royalty-free, Open Source Eclipse technology as a general-purpose application framework for your next desktop, fat client, or embedded application? With the support provided by the Eclipse Rich Client Platform (RCP) and the embedded version of the same (eRCP) the idea is certainly not as strange as it first sounds. So we'll explains why Eclipse is a solid desktop, rich-client, or embedded application framework with the potential to greatly simplify and accelerate development as well as forever change the way developers think about writing Java app... (more)

The Vision for Eclipse: An Interview with Mike Milinkovich

Mike Milinkovich, executive director of the Eclipse Foundation, has been kind enough to answer some questions for Enterprise Open Source Magazine. Rather than rattle off the usual ones about the name, about why Swing wasn't used, or how much influence IBM still has, Mike has fielded questions on some more current and topical subjects, as well as given us his insights onto the future. Thanks for taking the time to talk to us Mike. View Milinkovich on SYS-CON.TV EOSM: The Eclipse Foundation recently joined the Java Community Process. Can you tell us how this is going and what you expect to get out of this, as well as give to the JCP? Mike Milinkovich: Yes, we recently joined the JCP, as we also joined the OSGi Alliance and OMG. The reason for joining these organizations is that the Eclipse community relies heavily on the standards that are produced by these standards ... (more)

Eclipse Special: Bill Dudney Looks at Eclipse M8 Close-Up

To view our full selection of recent Eclipse stories click here As a kick off for this new column I figured I'd go over some of the good, bad and ugly in the new Eclipse M8 drop. I have been using M8 for two weeks now and I've accumulated a lot of notes of what I like and don't like in this latest of the drops before we get 3.0 final. Over all I am really impressed with this release. I went through the release notes and tried to comment on each aspect of what was documented as well as a couple of nice things that I found that are not in the release notes. Eye-candy - in the form of new welcome stuff. I like the look of it and seems to be very useful for RCP based apps. Since I'm not writing any RCP apps I probably won't have to write anything to plugin into the new Welcome extensibility points it's nice to know it's there. Cheat Sheets - very cool and very useful for... (more)

Milinkovich Named Eclipse's Executive Director

The Eclipse Board of Directors has named Mike Milinkovich executive director of the Eclipse Foundation, effective June 1. Milinkovich's broad experience in business development, hands-on knowledge of object-oriented technology, and responsiveness to the needs of the developer community led to his selection. Milinkovich previously served as vice president of OracleAS Technical Services at Oracle Corporation. During his more than 20 years of experience in the technology industry, he demonstrated solid executive leadership, fulfilling both technical and business roles. "I see my role as broadening the Eclipse open-source project and continuing the rapid growth of the Eclipse ecosystem," said Milinkovich. "It is my goal that Eclipse continues to be a focal point for open-source innovation in the software industry." Milinkovich's initial priorities will include the follow... (more)

ILOG Launches New Business Rule Studio for Eclipse

ILOG has just introduced its new Business Rule Studio Developer Edition (BR Studio). Built entirely on the Eclipse IDE and based on ILOG JRules, BR Studio will, for the first time, provide Java software developers with the opportunity to develop business rule technology using the Eclipse IDE, bringing the power of BRMS to mainstream software development organizations using Eclipse technology. ILOG, the first business rule technology vendor to support Eclipse, announced its membership in the Eclipse Vendor Consortium earlier this year. BR Studio is being made available as a free download that streamlines the evaluation process for Java/Eclipse developers. Software developers are discovering that business rule technology, especially a BRMS, allows them to reduce software maintenance costs associated with embedded legacy code, eases transitions to service-oriented archit... (more)

Eclipse AJAX Toolkit Framework

The AJAX Toolkit Framework (ATF) provides exemplary tools for creating and debugging AJAX applications. These tools include enhanced JavaScript editing features such as edit-time syntax checking, an embedded DOM browser, CSS Tools, JavaScript debugger, a JavaScript console, and an embedded Mozilla Web browser. The goal of ATF is to provide an ever-expanding set of high-function tools for AJAX developers. The AJAX Toolkit Framework is an extensible framework that supports using arbitrary AJAX runtimes through the Personality Builder function. This session will demonstrate how to use ATF to create, debug, and deploy an AJAX application on both Apache and J2EE servers. This session will also discussion the new functionality in the latest release of the AJAX Toolkit Framework on Eclipse and the proposed JavaScript Development Tool project on Eclipse.  Speaker Bio: Leugi... (more)

The Science and Art of Open Source Software License Management

The industrial revolution continues - starting with the steam engines of the 18th century, continuing with large-scale steel production, oil exploitation, electrical and photographic innovations of the 19th century, and moving on to the transportation, communications, computation and electronics of the 20th century. It is still early in the 21st century, but we can safely say software has become the engine that feeds the industrial, economic, medical, and gradually the political issues of our existence. The only way to satisfy the demand for the volume and complexity of the software that is needed to keep our world moving is to maximally share and reuse code within and across application domains. Open Source Software (OSS) is the epitome of code reuse, enabling complex applications to be realized rapidly, economically and safely. Probably the largest collaborative ... (more)

Web Components in 2015 By @warpech | @CloudExpo [#Cloud]

Web Components: What You Need to Know in 2015 Web Components are a collection of emerging web browser standards that are on a path to significantly change the way we develop UIs of web applications - a paradigm shift in web development. With polyfills already available in all modern web browsers, and full native support in Google Chrome, now is the perfect time to learn how you can benefit from using Web Components in your next project. In this article, you will learn about Web Components basics, available frameworks, Custom Elements, as well as challenges and applications associated with this new technology. After reading this article, developers will have enough background information to begin dabbling in Web Components. What are Web Components and can I use them? To a growing number of developers, the web browser is a first choice platform for building an applicati... (more)

A Close Look at Eclipse Che | @CloudExpo #API #Cloud #Eclipse #Microservices

In the era of microservices and cloud-native applications, Software Development Lifecycle (SDLC) is going through a major transformation. The combination of containers and continuous integration and deployment (CI/CD) is enabling rapid deployment of software like never before. And though the languages, runtimes, frameworks, deployment targets have changed dramatically, the tooling hasn’t evolved much. Developers are still relying on traditional integrated development environments (IDEs) such as Visual Studio, Eclipse, and IntelliJ. While they may be powerful, they are definitely not designed to take advantage of emerging technologies. Enter Eclipse Che, an integrated development environment that will get as portable as your code and applications. Imagine the power of carrying an IDE that’s bundled along with the code, required dependencies, and runtimes. That’s the... (more)